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Architects of Occupation: American Experts and Planning for Postwar Japan Current

In Architects of Occupation, Dayna L. Barnes exposes the wartime origins of occupation policy and broader plans for postwar Japan. She considers the role of presidents, bureaucrats, think tanks, the media, and Congress in policymaking. Members of these elite groups came together in an informal policy network that shaped planning.

Elite Warriors: Special Operations Forces Around the World Current

Presenting a collection of essays by leading military and security analysts, Elite Warriors offers a detailed assessment of the organization and capabilities of a selection of special operations forces from around the world.

Nuclear Energy Safety and International Cooperation (Routledge Studies in Environmental Policy) Current

Dr. Spencer Meredith | This book examines why five countries operating these dangerous reactors first signed international agreements to close them within a few years, then instead delayed for almost two decades. It looks at how political decision makers weighed the enormous short-term costs of closing those reactors against the long-term benefits of compliance, and how the political instability that dominated post-Communist transitions impacted their choices.

Gulf Security and the U.S. Military: Regime Survival and the Politics of Basing Current

Dr. Geoffrey Gresh | Gulf National Security and the U.S. Military examines both Gulf Arab national security and U.S. military basing relations with Gulf Arab monarchy hosts from the Second World War to the present day. Three in-depth country cases―Saudi Arabia, Bahrain, and Oman―help explain the important questions posed by the author regarding when and why a host nation either terminated a U.S. military basing presence or granted U.S. military basing access.

Chechnya's Terrorist Network: The Evolution of Terrorism in Russia's North Caucasus Current

Dr. Elena Pokalova | This authoritative account traces the emergence of terrorism in the volatile region of the North Caucasus from its origins in the early 1990s through the present day. It presents a detailed examination of local and global counterterrorism strategies―everything from military force, to diplomacy, to politicization―providing valuable insight into effective methods for fighting terrorism here and around the world.

Armed Groups: The 21st Century Threat Current

Dr. Peter Thompson | In this age of asymmetric warfare, battles are fought more and more against armed groups of opponents such as terrorists, insurgents, or transnational criminal organizations. This text is the first to categorize armed groups and analyze their characteristics in a systematic way to provide a thorough overview of all types of armed groups and the role they play in today’s security environment.

Colombian Army Adaptation To FARC Insurgency Current

Dr. Thomas Marks | Insurgency is a political campaign to mobilize the disaffected and the dispossessed into an alternative society. Until it can actually liberate areas openly, this takes the form of covert infrastructure.Governments, faced with violence directed at the system, initially go after that which they can see, insurgents with weapons, leaving the infrastructure virtually alone to grow and become ever more deadly.

Insurgency in Nepal Current

Dr. Thomas Marks | Insurgency-the use of protracted low intensity violence and political warfare against a government―has been one of the most pervasive and strategically significant forms of asymmetric conflict for the past century. This makes it both a complex and a particularly dangerous opponent, always challenging to the strategist who must deal with it.

Sustainability Of Colombian Military/Strategic Support For “Democratic Security” Current

Dr. Thomas Marks | Colombia has become synonymous in the popular mind with an intractable war waged against narco-terrorists. Not as understood is the strategic setting, wherein the illegal drug trade is not just linked to terrorism but rather is an integral part of a leftwing insurgency that continues to talk the language of the Cold War. This insurgency is the greatest threat to Bogota and to Washington’s interests in the region.

Building Better Armies: An Insider’s Account of Liberia New

Dr. Sean McFate | Following President Charles Taylor’s exile in 2003, the U.S. contracted DynCorp International to demobilize and rebuild the Armed Forces of Liberia and its Ministry of Defense; the first time in 150 years that one sovereign nation hired a private company to raise another sovereign nation’s military. This monograph explores the theory and practice behind the successful disarmament, demobilization, and reintegration (DDR) of the legacy military and security sector reform (SSR) that built the new one.